Welcome to Drew Barrymore Online - a comprehensive websites dedicated to the talented Drew Barrymore. Drew is an actress, director, producer, author and business woman. She is best known for her roles in Ever After, Never Been Kissed, E.T. and Charlie's Angels. This site is determined to bring you the most up to date information on this talented woman's career. I hope you enjoy your visit!

Drew is featured on the cover of the March issue of Harpers Bazaar magazine. The feature has her talking about her time in Hollywood from the early 1980’s until now.

After three decades in the spotlight, the actress and producer—and now beauty magnate—keeps stoking the flame.​

Drew Barrymore is remembering her Firestarter face, the expression she’d make when she was about to set things ablaze in the 1984 Stephen King classic. “I always said, ‘Back off. Back off. Just back off, and don’t make me angry.’ Then I would clench my fists and scrunch my face a little bit and breathe rapidly, focus my eyes on something, and then blow it up.” She adds wryly, “And although I’m such a peacekeeping hippie, I wish I had that power every once in a while. I totally wish I could blow some stuff up with my eyes.”

After her 36 years in the public eye—her story is so storied, it doesn’t bear repeating—Barrymore’s power is assured. While she characterizes her “heat” these days as more of a “simmer,” she’s happy to walk down a fiery memory lane. One may recall a picture of a baby Barrymore, in a puff-sleeved party frock, lighting King’s cigarette at the film’s premiere. “People were like, ‘Oh, that would be funny.’ I don’t even know if he was a smoker or not.” Pause. “Somehow when you have a young girl, things are sort of excused. … But I think it’s even cooler now. It’s such an awesome picture.”

During filming, “Stephen would come around. And I got to be in his office, that famous attic he writes in that’s on the cover of his book On Writing. It was just a very cool time, and not in Hollywood.”

Barrymore is also having a very cool time not in Hollywood. The mother of two young daughters—Olive, three, and Frankie, almost two—with her husband, art consultant Will Kopelman, she lives on two coasts, in Los Angeles and on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. She divides her time between raising her girls and blossoming her nascent businesses, Flower Beauty and Barrymore Wines. Flower, originally a film-production company, is now an empire that has grown with the 2013 launch of makeup and, most recently, eyewear.

“I don’t think I’m hot right now necessarily, because I have all my irons in a bunch of different fires,” Barrymore says, amused at the heavy-handedness of the metaphor. “I’m writing. I’m doing makeup. I’m doing design. I’m expanding Flower into different categories.” She adds, “I think it’s a huge mistake to think you have to burn bright for your whole life. You cannot sustain it. It’s exhausting, and it’s not very realistic.”

Barrymore, 41, describes her typical day thus: “Well, I have one of two days. One is really with my kids. Wake up, breakfast, activities, naps, activities, bath, and bed. Same as every parent—trying to make life fun for them, exhaust them, love them, feed them, be affectionate, be silly, and just be present. And drink a lot of caffeine.” (Tejava iced tea, by the way, extra large, which, after years of knowing Barrymore, I am yet to see her without.) “Another day could be in a lab or on a plane for a two-day jaunt on a business trip.” Like this cover shoot, for which we hurtled to Paris on a red-eye, then went straight to set. (Here, champagne was the new tea.) “My days are rarely mixed together,” she says. “I probably subconsciously do that so I can maximize my time with my kids.”

Barrymore has experienced Hollywood heat in all its iterations. “It’s been at different intervals: E.T. was a really exciting time; when I was doing The Wedding Singer and starting Flower Films; making Never Been Kissed and Charlie’s Angels; when I directed Whip It and did Grey Gardens in the same year. Those were times when I really pushed myself and I didn’t care about my sleep, my health. I didn’t have relationships or children that would be a priority over my work.”

Today, of course, that time is in the rearview mirror. “Hot is a state of mind,” she reflects. “It’s an energy. You’re hot when you’re motivated. It means you want it and you’re going after it.” For Barrymore, “hot isn’t about being on the A-list or having a hot body. It’s literally people who are on fire. Like Lena Dunham is on fire. Amy Schumer. Louis C.K. I think their brands of comedy and observational life stuff are some of the coolest I’ve seen in so many years.”

These days, Barrymore is more of a viewer than a participant in the movie business. “If I was obsessed with the world of film the way I used to be—and may one day be again—I would love to remake Firestarter. It’s such a cool concept. Ooh, and with the special effects now, you could do so much! It would be emotional and interesting because it’d all be together in this little girl.” Like Olive and Frankie? Wouldn’t they just be too adorable, lighting Stephen King’s cigarettes at parties? Barrymore lets out a dry-humored sigh. “Um, no.”

February 4, 2016   Ali   0 Comment Interviews, Magazines

This past week Drew & Will attended the Plates for Pediatrics dinner benefiting the NewYork-Presbyterian Phyllis and David Komansky Center for Children’s Health in New York City. Drew looked beautiful in a black and white polka dotted dress.

Gallery Links:
Drew Barrymore Online > 2016 > January 21 | Plates For Pediatrics Dinner
Drew Barrymore Online > 2016 > January 21 | Plates For Pediatrics Dinner – Audience

January 26, 2016   Ali   0 Comment Events, Images

The Daily caught up with Drew Barrymore, who founded her cosmetics line Flower Beauty in 2012, last week at the Financo retail forum in New York where she was in conversation with her father-in-law, the former CEO of Chanel Arie L. Kopelman, about her burgeoning beauty empire and her plans to roll out the concept in China, Australia, the UK, and online.

On never wanting to be a sellout celeb:
“After E.T. an onslaught of product placement opportunities came my way and for someone living in a single mother house in West Hollywood who didn’t have two nickels to rub together, it seemed very enticing. But I remember Steven Spielberg saying, “No. Don’t. Think about the longevity of your career. If you sell out now you can cheapen your message. Somehow at 7 years old it totally clicked and made so much sense to me.”

On saying no to that Covergirl contract:
“After that advice I had an allergy and fear of endorsing anything for the rest of my life. So when Covergirl came knocking, we had a wonderful, inspiring conversation but I said, ‘Thank you so much, I really love your brand but I just don’t endorse things.’ They came back to a year later and said, ‘What if we made you co-creative director and you would be in charge of all the marketing?’ I actually love marketing and would die to go into the advertising business because I think it’s so powerful. Covergirl saw the kind of person I was and gave me an opportunity that they thought might be more inspiring and fitting to me at this time in my life. And I loved it, especially the empowering messages for women. You know, girl dancing in her closet, Helmut Newton timeless style backdrop. These are the kind of women that I relate to because they’re telling you to be your best you, not to be someone else.”

On what inspired the launch of Flower Beauty:
“It was an auspicious aligning of the stars. I had been a co-creative director at Covergirl for seven years and as my contract was ending the woman who was the head of Walmart said she was looking for a different type of venture in her beauty department. So we met and came up with the philosophy of doing luxury goods at mass price point.”

On the concept of mass luxury:
“When you’re forced to think differently, you really do think outside the box. We tried to bring a brand promise and stay true to it and we actually managed to create really expensive high-end luxury formulas at those labs by changing the margins and putting all of our marketing and advertising dollars into the products. Now you see every big company putting their marketing money into social media and Snapchat anyway.”

On taking advice from her father-in-law:
“Arie has been such an amazing sounding board. I would go to him and say, ‘I’m struggling with the packaging, my heart’s over here, my guts over there,’ and he’d say, ‘Walk into a store, look around, tell me everything you see.’ And I would come back to say this and that. Then he would say, ‘Now look around and tell me what you don’t see.’ And it was the best advice ever. Arie and I also talked about the difference between name slapping companies and companies that really are thriving, where you can feel the investment of the people involved who are giving their lives over to it and caring about every piece of it.”

On her idea of success:
“The definition should be relief and employment. And I think it really does come down to the product, the formulas, and they way things are performing. Women know the difference. Flower Beauty is growing by the day. We started in 1,600 doors and now we’re in almost 4,000. We also just launched Flower Eyewear, and we’re number one at Walmart, which I’m very proud to say because I’m relieved it worked. Reviews are important—social media and creating a good marketing campaign that really speaks to women.”

On empowering women through makeup:
“As a woman, makeup is the greatest thing ever. I looked like the Crypt Keeper before I came here. A little foundation and lipstick on my lips and cheeks—and OK, a blowout—and it’s amazing how that has changed my whole perspective and my confidence. If you walk into a room and you’re insecure and looking for people to validate you, you’re screwed. You walk into a room and present who you are with some level of self awareness, confidence, and a kind heart, and you’re on a different cylinder. I think makeup is a great gateway to that.”

On marrying motherhood with the beauty business:
“I come from the world of movies and storytelling, so the story of empowering women has never been so vital to me because I now have two daughters and I am responsible for their journey and raising them into wonderful women. Flower Beauty has enabled me to spend my time being the kind of mother that I really wanted to be. I didn’t want to be on a film set from 5 a.m. until midnight, missing out on my children’s childhood. This way, I can be a businesswoman that wakes up with my kids, feeds them dinner, puts them to bed, and spends my weekends with them. When they’re 16 and slamming the door in my face, then maybe I’ll think about going back to film. But right now, these businesses exercise a different muscle for me. Being in films makes you lazy because you can wake up and be like, I want to be a news anchor today in Paris and you make a film about that, but oh my god the beauty business…wow, it’s challenging.”

On the future as a slow burn:
“Nothing happens overnight. Which is scary, because you want it to financially work overnight. But slow and steady wins the race. The companies that I aspire to be, like Honest and what Gwyneth Paltrow is doing with Goop, have taken years. You can see that it is their blood sweat and tears and it’s isn’t celebrity name slapping. More power to those people.”

(Source)

January 26, 2016   Ali   0 Comment Articles, Flower Beauty

Drew spoke with AOL about her beauty line, Flower Beauty and the challenges and rewards of working with her brand.

Drew Barrymore, the award-winning actress, producer, director, author and founder of Flower cosmetics is a force to be reckoned with. Having conquered the film and television industry, the star decided to try her hand in the beauty industry in 2012. Since then, Flower products have rocketed to success, named in Allure’s Best of Beauty Awards and Redbook’s Most Valuable Products. We sat down with her at the Financo CEO Forum on Monday evening to talk all things beauty.

The collection, which is sold exclusively at Walmart, is custom-formulated with the same ingredients used in higher end, luxury makeup. Rather than pay for advertising, all marketing dollars are put into the formula, Barrymore said, which makes the line significantly more affordable and available to a larger demographic of women.

“I’ve always been about an all-ages party, and I really think that goes for economics as well,” the reigning beauty queen said when we sat down with her. “Women deserve to get the same quality makeup at a mass retailer that they do at a department store, and we as a company figured out a way to do that, so that’s our brand promise. And it is really challenging, but it feels really right,” she said.

Instead of paying for print advertisements and commercials, the beauty brand’s sole promotion comes from Barrymore herself and real people who actually love Flower products.

“I have the luxury and ability and privilege of getting to do lots of magazines…which really helps,” the actress said. “And, you know, you can go on shows, but really the social thing for me I find most challenging.”

Social media plays an enormous role in Flower’s marketing strategy. While many companies will buy product endorsements from bloggers and vloggers, Barrymore’s philosophy rests on authentic promotion. “In the social world,” she said, “Authenticity is the name of the game.”

Despite Barrymore’s obvious success as a female leader in the beauty industry, she’s way too modest. “The beauty industry is just like my ego,” she laughed. “It will not allow me to think I’m a leader in anything. It makes me feel like I’ve got to get up every day and work really hard.”

The business is certainly humbling, “but I’m okay with that,” she said. “I like humble pie a lot — I eat it all the time anyway so it’s good. It’s a good business for me.”

The actress and businesswoman’s attitude is inspiring, and has clearly proven rewarding. After a phenomenal year in 2015, the brand has a lot in store for 2016. One of the many new products rolling out in the coming months is a revolutionary lip cream. “It’s like a new innovation in matte,” Barrymore said of the cream, which she was wearing when we chatted. “It’s actually a creamy matte and it is so pigmented and has such amazing staying power that doesn’t fray into the cracks of your lips.”

She was actually wearing two Flower products when we spoke — the foundation and lip cream — and she couldn’t have looked more natural or flawless. There’s no doubt that when it comes to Drew Barrymore, nothing is off limits. A total powerhouse, she possesses business savvy, genuine enthusiasm for her work and a vested interest in bringing great products to as many women as possible. It’s safe to say that here at AOL, we’re big fans of Drew.

(Source)

January 25, 2016   Ali   0 Comment Articles, Flower Beauty

Walmart helped launch actor Drew Barrymore’s retail career — but now the Hollywood star is getting ready to spread her wings.

The 40-year-old founder and chief executive of Flower Beauty, a five-year old make-up venture whose products are sold exclusively by Walmart, is launching her own e-commerce web site this year and is in talks with retailers abroad about carrying her assortment of products.

“It’s a big opportunity for us to attract new customers,” the actor said during a presentation at the annual Financo CEO forum, where her father-in-law Arie Kopelman, the former president of Chanel Inc., interviewed her.

Barrymore’s line is marketed as luxury quality sold at inexpensive prices. It includes lipstick from $5 to $7 and eye shadow for $10 and foundation for $14, according to Walmart.com.

The eye makeup is the No. 1 brand sold at discount chain.

Barrymore told The Post she is being approached by international retailers “of all types” and that she would like to introduce Flower Beauty in Australia, the UK, China and South America.

“But I won’t hike up my prices,” Barrymore said of her expansion plans. The actress declined to disclose Flower Beauty’s sales, but pointed to the fact that it’s sold in nearly all of Walmart’s 4,000 stores.

“They would drop us like a hot potato if we didn’t deliver,” she added.

The discounter recently renewed its contract, which excludes international rights.

While Barrymore said she is “proud” to work with Walmart, she conceded that “I get this look when I say I’m exclusive to Walmart, and yeah, I get it.”

The daughter of John Barrymore and a mom or two young girls, Drew has dialed back her acting career to focus on motherhood and her business, she said.

(Source)

January 19, 2016   Ali   0 Comment Flower Beauty

The actress looks back at her early struggle in Hollywood for stability, safety and a sense of family

Drew Barrymore, 40, has starred in more than 50 films, including “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” and “The Wedding Singer.” She is author of “Wildflower” (Dutton), a collection of autobiographical essays. She spoke with Marc Myers.

My childhood lasted four years. Then I went to work. Though my father, grandparents, great-grandparents and great-uncles and great-aunts all had been prominent actors in their day, my parents weren’t in the business when I was born. In fact, they weren’t even together. I started life with little more than my last name.

I grew up with my mother, Jaid, on North Poinsettia Place in West Hollywood, which was pretty rough in the late 1970s. We lived in a modest apartment in a one-story white stucco duplex.

What I remember most are the bougainvillea vines that climbed 25 feet up the wall outside and bloomed beautiful burgundy flowers. Those colorful vines were heartwarming, like a big smile.

In the late ’70s, my mother was an aspiring actress who worked two jobs at nearby comedy and music clubs. Many of my mother’s friends were artists who were pretty wild and eccentric. Those were happy years for me.

My father, John, had been a film and TV actor, but by the time I was born he was living a far wilder, free-spirited life. I know he had his demons, but I loved him. As a child, I thought he was fascinating, interesting and funny. I also never wanted to be heavy about anything that was going on around me. No matter what, I always carried the umbrella of joy, probably as a survival strategy.

The apartment I lived in with my mother had a patch of backyard with a swing set and an avocado tree with willowy branches. The yard was a place of solace, and I loved that the tree was always there with food ready to eat.

When my mother went to work, a young girl would come over and baby-sit me. If my mother didn’t return in time, the girl would drop me off at friends’ houses. I was never left alone, but I was lonely.

Kids don’t really like things changing all the time. For me, everything was oceanic and passing through, and nothing was grounded. I wasn’t negative or dark. I just didn’t feel emotionally safe. I developed a deep appreciation for friends and the need to stick together.

My mother began taking me on auditions for TV ads when I was 3. Then came films starting at age 5. I remember working so hard to impress the adults evaluating me. Doing well and impressing adults led to jobs that provided consistency, safety and stability. I knew where I’d be going each day, I knew what was expected of me, and I saw the same people on the set. The actors and directors became like a second family.

After the success of “E.T.” in 1982, my career took off. My mother quit her jobs to manage my career and bought us a house in nearby Sherman Oaks, which uprooted me. I didn’t want to leave our West Hollywood apartment and the people next door.

Over the next few years my mother and I had a challenging relationship. When I was 14, it became clear we had to part ways, and fortunately my mother was in full support of me. I moved into my own apartment in L.A.’s Park La Brea area. The owner didn’t care how old I was.

My work in the movies forced me to grow up fast, so living alone at that age wasn’t a challenge. I felt much older than 14. I learned to take care of myself, hold down a job and even do the laundry.

I read every classic novel I could get my hands on—plus the thesaurus and dictionary. Eventually, I began to act again and later to produce and direct, once again surrounding myself with a creative family.

Today, I live in West Hollywood with my husband, Will, and our two daughters, Olive and Frankie. Our three-bedroom house has lots of burgundy bougainvillea and light, and it feels like France.

We live near the apartment my mother and I shared in the ’70s, so I often drive by. I have this nagging desire to knock on the door with hopes the people will let me in for a look around.

But if they did, I really don’t know what I’d be looking for or what I’d learn about myself. I suppose there’s part of me that’s still seeking the rest of my childhood.

(Source)

January 19, 2016   Ali   0 Comment Articles, Drew, Wildflower

In her memoir Wildflower, Barrymore reveals what it’s really been like living in the public eye your whole life.

In her new memoir Wildflower, Drew Barrymore opens up about her (truly) incredible journey—from child star to young woman in the spotlight to busy entrepreneur. Here, 10 things we learned from her fascinating book.

1. Barrymore’s ultimate role model used to be Pippi Longstocking.

Although she had posters of Blondie, Superman, and KISS on her walls as a kid, her true idol was Pippi Longstocking. “Every day in Pippi’s world was a chance to go down the Nile or fight pirates,” she writes. “She made you feel like there was nothing you couldn’t do if you put your mind to it.”

2. She scattered her dog’s ashes at Ghandi’s house in India.

Barrymore got her dog Flossy when she was 19 years old. She took Flossy and her other dog, Templeton, everywhere with her: movie sets, offices, road trips. So, when Flossy died, it hit her hard. “I took Flossy to India and gave her a proper and fitting send-off,” she writes. “The first place I spread some of her ashes was at Ghandhi’s house in New Delhi. Then I took her to a Buddhist monastery way up in the Himalayas. And third, I put the rest in the Ganges River off a quiet path in the countryside. I thanked her over and over for her companionship.”

3. Cameron Diaz is her daughter Frankie’s godmother.

Barrymore is still really tight with her Charlie’s Angels costar. She was one of Diaz’s bridesmaids and made Diaz her second daughter’s godmother.

4. She’s a daredevil.

Diaz and Barrymore have been on amazing adventures together, including training kung fu for Charlie’s Angels, scuba diving with sharks, and even sky diving.

5. Her scream broke the tape when she was auditioning for E.T.

When she was auditioning for E.T., which was originally called A Boy’s Life, in 1982, Steven Spielberg asked her to prove she had the vocal chops for the flick. “I screamed so loud that I broke the device and the tape stopped,” she writes. The audition scored her the life-changing role.

6. She gave Princess Diana an E.T. doll.

E.T. was such a massive international hit that Barrymore traveled all over the world to promote it. “All of a sudden, I was a girl with a stamped passport to my life’s wildest adventures,” she writes. “I was in Germany. Norway. Paris. England. I met Princess Diana and got to present her an E.T. doll.”

7. Flashing David Letterman was a huge turning point for her.

During her “self-discovery” period, Barrymore flashed late-night host Letterman while making an appearance on his show. At the time, it felt like a fun thing to do for laughs, but when she watched the tape later, something clicked. “As I watched myself and my friends laughing from an objective perspective, I realized right then and there that this was the end of an era for me,” she writes. “And so I started my journey into no sex scenes in movies, modesty clauses in my contracts, and a total lack of nudity in any public forum from there on out.”

8. She wants to be buried under an avocado tree.

When she was growing up in West Hollywood, Barrymore spent her afternoons playing under an avocado tree. “To say that I ate 10 avocados a day off that tree was no exaggeration,” she writes. “In fact the significance of the avocado tree is still as strong as can be for me. I even have it in my will that I want to be buried under one, or have some of my ashes put there.”

9. She just knew she was supposed to work with Adam Sandler.

So she followed her instinct and, when she was in her early 20s, she “begged, borrowed and stole to get him to sit down with me” at a coffee shop to see if they could come up with a comedy tailor-made for the two of them. That’s how The Wedding Singer was born. “I wanted us to be like an old-fashioned movie couple. He was my cinematic soulmate.”

10. She’s *very* protective of her plants.

After filming E.T., Barrymore has a traumatic memory of her mom calling in a gardener without warning her. “Someone had cut down the bougainvillea bush. I started to cry. This was beauty. This was nature,” she writes. “We had lived here for seven years and no one had pruned or manicured anything and everything was fine! … I felt like everything was crashing down around me.” Now she has a gardener who must consult with her before every snip.

You can buy Drew Barrymore’s book Wildflower on Amazon.

(Source)

December 17, 2015   Ali   0 Comment Articles, Wildflower

Looks like Drew Barrymore and her daughters have officially embraced the spirit of the season.

With the holidays right around the corner, the actress and Wildflower author, 40, has created a personalized holiday card this year via Shutterfly – and PEOPLE has the exclusive first look.

The festive card captures Barrymore’s free-spirited nature and devotion to daughters Olive, 3, and Frankie, 1. In one photo she is seen handing Olive a bouquet of wildflowers, while in the other she lies in the grass and laughs with Frankie.

The Miss You Already star keeps her look natural in the images, wearing a cream dress with little makeup and letting her long hair hang loose around her face.

To keep with the theme, the word “Joy” is spelled out with twigs and holly leaves, along with a small banner to mark the year.

In the far right corner, the card reads “Happy Holidays” and the actress simply signs it “love Drew.”

Along with her holiday cards, Barrymore also curated her own collection of personalized holiday gifts with Shutterfly. From ornaments to pillows and candles, the actress has selected her favorite items to give to those who matter most.

(Source)

December 11, 2015   Ali   2 Comments Family